Payment Mechanisms

Electronic Payments

Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Mechanisms

Federal entities should use the EFT mechanisms prescribed below to comply with the EFT provisions of 31 CFR Part 208.

Automated Clearing House (ACH)

Same Day ACH

In September 2017, Fiscal Service published a final rule at 31 CFR part 210, "Federal Government Participation in the Automated Clearing House", which adopted Nacha (formerly known as NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association) industry rules governing Same Day ACH transactions. In March 2020, Fiscal Service amended Part 210 to address changes made by Nacha through the 2019 Nacha Operating Rules & Guidelines, including supplements.

Same Day ACH allows Treasury-disbursed federal entities to make ACH payments through the Fiscal Service that settle on the same day that they are originated. Treasury-disbursed federal entities have the discretion to decide if a payment should be made by Same Day ACH, subject to the requirements in this chapter. A Same Day ACH fee of $.052 per payment will be paid for by the Fiscal Service.

Same Day ACH provides Treasury-disbursed federal entities with a more cost-effective method for any type of payment where same-day settlement benefits the federal entity and the government as a whole. This includes making timely payments to avoid Prompt Payment interest penalties and to take advantage of discounts offered by vendors for paying early.

Federal entities in need of same-day settlement should consider Same Day ACH as a lower cost alternative for the government than Fedwire. However, not all payments can be disbursed by Same Day ACH. In accordance with the ACH rules a Same Day ACH payment cannot exceed $100,000. Federal entities in need of same-day settlement for payments over $100,000 would need to use Fedwire.

Same Day ACH should not be used to accelerate benefit payments, salary payments, or similar recurring payments that are currently scheduled on a specific date. Fiscal Service will periodically review federal entities' Same Day ACH payment activity to ensure that federal entities are using this payment option appropriately. The total dollar value of Same Day ACH requests made by a specific ALC and TAS combination cannot exceed $50 million on a single payment date. If the total dollar amount of Same Day ACH payment requests from the combination of a specific ALC and TAS exceeds $50 million on a single payment date, all of the payments will be delayed and will settle the following business day. All Same Day ACH payments will be run through the Treasury Offset Program to determine if the payment recipient is subject to offset to pay a delinquent debt to a government federal entity.

Same Day ACH Requests through SPS

Same Day ACH payments must be requested manually through SPS and certified by the federal entity's certifying officer. All Same Day ACH payment requests through SPS must be made by 4:00 p.m. ET in order to meet the Federal Reserve’s Same Day window of 4:45 p.m. ET. Same Day ACH requests that miss this processing window will be posted and settled on the next business day. Each Same Day ACH payment requested through SPS cannot exceed $100,000. The total dollar value of Same Day ACH requests made through SPS by combination of a specific ALC and TAS cannot exceed $50 million on a single payment date. If a federal entity certifies Same Day ACH payment requests through SPS from the combination of a specific ALC and TAS that exceed $50 million on a single payment date, all of the payments will settle the following business day.

Same Day ACH Requests through ASAP

All Same Day ACH payment requests in the ASAP.gov application must be submitted by 4:30 p.m. ET to meet the Federal Reserve's Same Day window of 4:45 p.m. ET. Any Same Day ACH requests that miss these processing windows will be posted and settled on the next business day.

The ASAP.gov application has controls in place to assist the federal entity in monitoring Same Day ACH payment requests. The federal entity’s certifying officer can choose whether or not their recipient organizations are allowed to request Same Day ACH payments and they can also require that a Same Day ACH payment is reviewed by the federal entity before the payment is submitted.

If allowed by the federal entity's certifying officer, recipient organizations will be able to request Same Day ACH payments valued at $100,000 or less per payment. Additionally, recipient organizations cannot request more than $50 million in Same Day ACH, by the combination of ALC and TAS per payment date. Same Day ACH payment requests made by recipient organizations from a specific ALC and TAS combination that exceed $50 million on a single payment date will settle the following business day.

FedWire

Fedwire is an electronic transfer system developed and maintained by the Federal Reserve that allows a federal entity to make payments with a same-day settlement. This payment mechanism is intended for high-dollar, low-volume payments that must be paid the same day the payment is requested.

Federal entities in need of same-day settlement should consider Same Day ACH as a lower cost alternative for the government than Fedwire. Same Day ACH provides Treasury-disbursed federal entities with an option for any type of payment where same-day settlement benefits the federal entity and the government as a whole. This includes making timely payments to avoid Prompt Payment interest penalties and to take advantage of discounts offered by vendors for paying early. However, a Same Day ACH payment cannot exceed $100,000. Federal entities in need of same-day settlement for payments over $100,000 would need to use Fedwire.

Stored Value Cards

Overview

This chapter prescribes the policies and procedures governing authorized federal entities’ use of Stored Value Cards (SVCs), sometimes known as “smart cards,” to electronically disburse or otherwise transfer funds. It describes:

The different types of SVCs administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury), Bureau of the Fiscal Service (Fiscal Service),

How federal entities implement and participate in an SVC program,

A participating federal entity’s responsibilities in managing an SVC program, and

Treasury’s responsibilities in managing an SVC program.

SVCs subject to this chapter include SVCs issued in programs used to support U.S. government operations domestically and overseas, including "EagleCash®," "EZpay," "Navy Cash®," "Marine Cash®," and other similar programs. Typically, SVCs are used in closed environments.

For additional information about SVCs visit TFM Volume I, Part 4A, Chapter 3000.

Background

An SVC is a smart card capable of storing electronic monetary value on the card’s embedded computer chip. In some cases, an SVC also contains a branded debit card feature to process retail transactions or allow the SVC holder to obtain cash at an automated teller machine (ATM) outside the closed environment of the SVC program. Federal entities may issue SVCs capable of having value added on either a “reloadable” or “non-reloadable” basis. Once issued, federal entities and authorized cardholders may add value to reloadable cards via encrypted hardware devices assigned to a federal entity office or installation. As the SVC cardholder adds value to the card, or spends or transfers the value on the card via SVC hardware devices located at retailers or other SVC program locations, the SVC balance changes reflecting the amount spent or transferred to or from the card’s value.

Treasury, typically in partnership with federal entities such as DOD, provides SVC to federal entities to disburse, transfer, and otherwise manage funds in a variety of closed environments. For example, the Departments of the Army and Air Force, and U.S. Marine Corps use the EZPay SVC to provide recruits at military training sites with a pay advance to purchase supplies and services required during military training at the merchant locations on base. The U.S. military uses EagleCash® at bases around the world as the standard means for deployed soldiers, civilians, and contractors to facilitate the movement of funds to and from an SVC holder’s domestic bank account, convert foreign currency, or otherwise obtain needed funds. The Navy Cash® card service is used to replace coins and currency on-board ships, and, because it is a branded debit card, it allows SVC holders to make purchases at merchants who accept the appropriate network(s)’ PIN-based branded debit cards or obtain cash from ATMs that accept branded debit cards when ashore.

A Treasury-designated agent holds the funds for an SVC program in an account established and maintained by Treasury, sometimes referred to as a “pooled” account or “funds pool.”

Authority

Treasury designates financial institutions and Federal Reserve Banks (FRBs) to act as depositaries of public monies and financial or fiscal agents for SVC programs pursuant to 12 U.S.C. §§ 90, 265, 266, 391, 1434, 1464(k), and other applicable laws. Treasury designates depositaries of monies pursuant to 31 U.S.C. § 3303 and 31 CFR Part 202. Treasury-designated financial and fiscal agents may perform reasonable duties as required by Treasury.

Federal entities are required to deposit funds in the Treasury or with a Treasury-designated depositary, pursuant to 31 U.S.C. § 3302(c)(1). See TFM Volume I, Part 5, Chapter 4100, Section 4120. Treasury disburses federal payments pursuant to 31 U.S.C. §§ 3321, 3322, 3327, and 3332.

Policies and Procedures

Policy, Benefits, and Use

SVC programs further the Federal Government’s goals to provide timely, efficient, and accurate disbursement and collection services in a secure and convenient way.

To further the goals of the EFT legislation included in the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, federal entities should use SVCs or some other electronic payment mechanism, whenever feasible, to replace or minimize the transfer and disbursement of funds using cash, paper checks, third-party drafts, imprest funds, or other non-electronic payment mechanisms. SVC programs are especially appropriate when alternative electronic mechanisms are not available. They reduce the use of cash and checks in contingency areas of operation where access to on-line commercial payment and collection systems is limited or nonexistent, or can provide an advance of pay to support military training. SVC programs improve a federal entity’s financial controls and cash management capabilities, streamline administrative processes, and provide SVC holders with convenient access to their funds. SVCs may be used to:

Provide immediate availability of funds to SVC holders, both domestically and abroad, Provide SVC holders with convenient, safe access to funds, as well as the ability to use their funds at the numerous places where SVCs are accepted,

Eliminate interchange fees for transactions, thereby resulting in lowered costs for merchants and cardholders,

Minimize new trainee recruit processing time by the military,

Reduce the cost of securing, transporting, and accounting for cash,

Supplant the use of U.S. currency overseas under certain conditions as determined by the Treasury and the federal entity,

Provide a fully auditable accounting trail for financial transactions,

Reduce manually intensive back-end processes associated with scrip, vouchers, meal tickets, money orders, traveler’s checks, and other non-electronic payment mechanism, and

Reduce exposure to risk of theft and loss of funds.

A federal entity should contact Treasury (see Contacts below) to discuss whether or not its funds transfer and other financial transaction processes could be improved by using SVCs. If so, Treasury and the federal entity can determine the type of SVC program that would best meet the federal entity’s needs and the needs of the federal entity’s constituents.

Procedures for Federal Entity Implementation of an SVC Program (Section 9030)

Each federal entity determines, in consultation with Treasury (see Contacts below), the funds transfer and/or other financial transaction processes for which an SVC program would be appropriate and the type of SVC that would best meet the federal entity’s needs and the needs of the federal entity’s constituents. To implement an SVC program for any of its funds transfer or financial transaction processes, a federal entity must:

Enter into an agreement with Treasury. The agreement will describe the terms of the federal entity’s implementation of an SVC program and the respective responsibilities of the federal entity and Treasury for operation of the program, as described in this chapter. In addition, the agreement will specify the type of program and SVC(s) the federal entity will implement, the federal entity’s funding schedule, and the fees and costs to be paid by the federal entity and Treasury,

Designate an SVC project manager (see subsection 9035.10),

Designate accountable officers (see subsection 9035.20),

Establish how the federal entity will implement its SVC program (see Section 9040), and

Establish a funding system by which the federal entity will deposit funds in an account(s) at a Treasury-designated financial institution (that is, a Treasury-designated depositary and financial agent) to fund all SVCs issued (see subsection 9040.40).

SVC Project Manager and Accountable Officers

SVC Project Manager

Before implementing an SVC program, the federal entity must designate an SVC project manager.

The SVC project manager must manage the SVC program and the activities described in this chapter in accordance with the:

Agreement between Treasury and the federal entity,

SVC Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and other instructional documents, and

Program-specific policies and procedures developed by the federal entity in consultation with Treasury.

The SVC project manager:

Acts as the federal entity’s liaison among Treasury, the federal entity, and other interested stakeholders,

Provides full support for the SVC program within the federal entity,

Develops and obtains federal entity approval for the concept of operation and other related plans for the implementation of the SVC program for the federal entity,

Obtains and maintains the Security Assessment and Authorization (SA&A), Authority to Operate (ATO), or similar approval for the SVC program to access the federal entity’s computer networks so that the SVC program can be deployed and operate as designed,

Secures federal entity funding approvals necessary for the SVC program,

Coordinates the federal entity’s implementation of the SVC program,

Oversees and obtains federal entity approvals for changes to the program,

Transfers sufficient funds to Treasury, or its financial or fiscal agent, to ensure full funding for the federal entity’s obligations with respect to outstanding SVCs, in accordance with any applicable interagency agreements,

Maintains accurate up-to-date lists of accountable officers, and

Along with the federal entity’s accountable officers, complies with other SVC program policies and procedures as described in the agreement, SOPs, and other SVC instructional documents.

The federal entity must specifically identify the tasks for which the SVC project manager is responsible in the agreement between Treasury and the federal entity.

SVC Accountable Officers

Before implementing an SVC program, the federal entity must designate one or more accountable officers.

The SVC accountable officers must manage the SVC program and the activities described in this chapter in accordance with the:

Agreement between Treasury and the federal entity,

SVC standard operating procedures (SOPs) and other instructional documents, and

Program-specific policies and procedures developed by the federal entity in consultation with Treasury.

Specifically, the SVC accountable officers:

May issue SVCs and PINs to cardholders,

Ensure that all enrollment processes are followed when issuing SVCs and PINs to cardholders,

Account for outstanding SVCs and the funds associated with each SVC, to the extent the SVCs and funds are within the control of the federal entity. These duties include but are not limited to accounting for funds loaded onto accountable official and other federal entity cards that are used in the accountable official’s area of responsibility and assisting in the collection of cardholders’ negative balances while a cardholder is in the accountable official’s area of responsibility,

Provide instructions to Treasury’s financial or fiscal agent as to the proper allocation of funds among the SVCs that are issued, by account number and, where feasible, cardholder name,

Maintain accurate, up-to-date inventories of SVC program hardware and equipment, including POS terminals, laptops, kiosks, CADs, SVCs, and other items associated with the SVC program that are delivered to federal entity locations,

Safeguard SVCs as sensitive items, to the extent the SVCs are within the control of the federal entity (the federal entity is accountable for SVCs issued by the federal entity at SVC-issuance locations), and

Along with the SVC project manager, comply with other SVC program policies and procedures as described in the agreement, SOPs, and other SVC instructional documents.

The federal entity must specifically identify the tasks for which each accountable officer is responsible. The federal entity should segregate the duties appropriately in accordance with the federal entity’s policies and procedures.

As applicable and appropriate, accountable officers are responsible for the duties and responsibilities of a certifying official or a disbursing official (see TFM Volume I, Part 4A, Chapter 3000), depending upon the designation of the accountable officer, as set forth in 31 U.S.C. §§ 3322 (disbursing officials), 3325 (vouchers), 3528 (certifying officials), and other applicable laws.

Federal Entity and Treasury Responsibilities in Managing an SVC Program

Federal Entity Responsibilities

Each federal entity must manage its own participation in a Treasury SVC program in accordance with the requirements of applicable federal law, this chapter, the agreement between Fiscal Service and the federal entity (see section 9030), SVC policies, and other governing documents, for example, SOPs. For any given SVC program, a federal entity may elect to distribute SVCs and PINs directly to its cardholders or, alternatively, may ask Treasury to direct Treasury’s financial or fiscal agent to distribute the SVCs and PINs directly to cardholders, as approved by the federal entity. In managing an SVC program in accordance with the agreement, SVC governing documents, and federal entity-specific procedures, the federal entity:

Ensures appropriate anti-money laundering controls and procedures are in place in order to document the flows of monies onto or off of the card (at federal entity locations),

Assists Treasury with efforts to collect unpaid balances owed to the funds pool by merchants, SVC holders, and other SVC program participants (other than losses as a result of theft, fraud, or unauthorized use of an SVC). Collection efforts include, but are not limited to, contacting the cardholder, processing wage offsets and other collection activities,

Ensures the proper maintenance of SVC program hardware and equipment, including POS terminals, laptops, kiosks, CADs, SVCs, and other items associated with the SVC program that are delivered to federal entity locations,

Provides SVC cardholders with all disclosures, agreements, instructions, and other communications required by federal laws, regulations, policies, and procedures (see subsection 9040.50), and makes necessary adjustments as these requirements change,

Complies with Treasury’s and the federal entity’s security and internal control procedures, including but not limited to procedures with respect to lost or stolen SVCs (see subsection 9040.30),

Manages the federal entity-specific software and hardware certification process, Funds the SVCs (see subsection 9040.40),

Fully supports any updates to SVC hardware, software, and related equipment, Provides communication protocols for kiosks and other SVC devices,

Protects the confidentiality of any Privacy Act, confidential, or nonpublic information provided to the federal entity in connection with an SVC program, when the data is within the federal entity’s custody or control,

Properly accounts for and reports the funds allocated to SVCs (see Section 9050), Ensures the timely and accurate transmittal of transaction processing files from SVC devices (e.g., laptops, POS terminals, CADs, and kiosks) to Treasury-designated financial or fiscal agents, as applicable,

Pays fees associated with the federal entity’s implementation of the SVC program (see Section 9060),

Aggressively investigates and prosecutes (or assists in investigations and prosecutions of) end-user theft, fraud, unauthorized use, or other improper use of the SVC service that occurs in federal entity areas of operation and assists in obtaining restitution for the party suffering the loss,

Compensates the SVC funds pool for losses that result from theft, fraud, unauthorized use, or other improper use of SVC equipment or resources for which the federal entity is responsible, unless the funds pool has been reimbursed from other sources or Treasury determines that such compensation is unnecessary or does not serve the SVC program’s best interests,

Maintains responsibility for all federal entity and accountable officer SVC functions performed by the federal entity’s contractors (if any). These duties may include, but are not limited to, back-office functions (e.g., obtaining an ATO, generating federal entity documentation for interagency meetings, etc.) and customer-facing functions (e.g., disbursing/finance office functions, etc.) that the federal entity allows a contractor to perform,

Manages the SVC equipment, inventory and distribution of SVCs to authorized SVC cardholders, except as these duties may be performed by a Treasury-designated financial or fiscal agent at Treasury’s direction,

Uses the required SVC equipment as designated by Treasury or its financial or fiscal agent, Complies with SVC enrollment processes, including the timely, accurate transmittal of required enrollment information and documentation to Treasury-designated financial or fiscal agents, as applicable,

Trains federal entity employees on proper implementation and management of the federal entity’s participation in a Treasury SVC program, and

Maintains full accountability of any SVC equipment in their inventory. Treasury, in consultation with the federal entity and as described in the agreement or other governing documents (for example, SOPs), assigns other responsibilities to the federal entity as necessary or desirable for a particular SVC program.

Treasury Responsibilities

Treasury, either directly or through its designated financial or fiscal agent, assists an federal entity with the implementation and operation of the SVC program(s) for the federal entity. In accordance with the agreement and SVC governing documents, Treasury:

Provides software and hardware upgrades and enhancements through the Treasury-established change management process,

Files a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) with appropriate regulators and notifies law enforcement when there is evidence that the card is being used for an unauthorized purpose, such as money laundering or as a vehicle to commit a financial crime,

Assists federal entity in certifying the SVC software as required by the federal entity-specific hardware and software certification program,

Manages the proper distribution of, and accounting for, SVC program funds pools, including residual funds on expired SVCs (see subsection 9040.60),

Provides financial and other reports on the SVC cards, transactions, and settlement activity,

Provides SVC hardware and card stock to the federal entity,

Protects the confidentiality of any Privacy Act, confidential, or nonpublic information in connection with an SVC program, when the data is within the custody or control of Treasury or Treasury’s financial or fiscal agent,

Provides customer service to the federal entity with respect to the use of SVCs, SVC software, and its systems,

Provides customer service to all SVC cardholders,

Trains federal entity personnel on the operation of the SVC program and systems,

Provides the federal entity with the disclosures and other SVC program information that the federal entity must provide to the SVC holders,

Designates official and up-to-date points of contact for operations at Treasury and its designated financial or fiscal agents,

Designates and compensates a financial or fiscal agent to operate the SVC program and manage the SVC funds pool(s),

Provides a mechanism to transfer funds associated with the SVC program,

Provides marketing services,

Assists with the deployment of the SVC program at locations determined by the federal entity in consultation with Treasury,

Provides hardware delivery tracking reports, which contain information about SVC program hardware shipped to and from federal entity locations,

Provides timely expense reports and invoices for fees and costs incurred by the federal entity,

Assists with the efforts of the federal entity and law enforcement officials to investigate and prosecute cases of waste, fraud, or abuse within the SVC program, and to collect restitution for the funds pool when such restitution is available,

Provides SVC software and documentation to the federal entity, as necessary to implement and manage the SVC program, and

Establishes a formal process to implement and manage software and other technical changes to the SVC program

Security and Internal Controls

The federal entity must establish and implement policies governing security and internal controls with respect to its SVC program in conformance with Government-wide and Treasury policies and procedures. The federal entity must establish and implement controls to protect against:

Loss, theft, and fraudulent or unauthorized use of SVC equipment, card stock inventories, preprinted forms, and other items used to access SVC systems, when such items are within the custody and control of the federal entity,

Loss, theft, and fraudulent or unauthorized disclosure of PINs, when PINs are within the custody and control of the federal entity,

Loss, theft, and fraudulent or unauthorized use of SVCs and SVC hardware in the custody and control of the federal entity or its contractor's illegal use of the card as a money-laundering vehicle,

Fraudulent or unauthorized use of on-line or off-line SVC software under its control, and

Other losses caused by theft or fraudulent or unauthorized activities in the federal entity’s implementation of the SVC program.

The federal entity’s procedures must include a process for promptly reporting, and for educating SVC holders on how to promptly report, to Treasury or Treasury’s financial or fiscal agent any loss, theft, or fraudulent or unauthorized use of SVC cards, PINs, passwords, or other security breach or malfunction involving the SVC program.

The federal entity must implement an internal audit process to review and recommend internal controls and safeguards with respect to its SVC program in conformance with Government-wide and the minimum Treasury policies and procedures. Periodically, Treasury and the federal entity review and update the criteria upon which the audit reviews are based.

Funding SVCs

Each federal entity is responsible for fully funding the SVC funds pool for the total value of SVCs issued or loaded by the federal entity or Treasury’s financial or fiscal agents, in accordance with the agreement between the federal entities or other governing documents (for example, SOPs) for the federal entity’s implementation of the SVC program(s). For value loaded into the SVC program by SVC cardholders at kiosks, the federal entity and Treasury work collaboratively to ensure full collection from the SVC holder (see Section 9030 for information on the MOU).

Disclosure

The federal entity must provide SVC cardholders with all necessary disclosures as required by law, including but not limited to, disclosures required by Regulation E (12 CFR 1005), if applicable, and as provided to the federal entity by Treasury. Among other things, the disclosures address the SVC cardholders’ responsibilities for protecting the SVC and mitigating damages from loss, theft, and fraudulent or unauthorized use of the SVC. The federal entity must obtain the necessary authorizations from the SVC cardholder, must provide any necessary disclosures, and must facilitate the collection of monies owed to the SVC funds pool by the SVC cardholder at any time after activation of the SVC. The federal entity should consult with the federal entity’s legal counsel to determine any federal entity-specific disclosure requirements associated with a particular SVC program. Treasury and its financial or fiscal agent must review any SVC program disclosures or other forms prepared by a federal entity before being disseminated.

Residual Funds (Escheat)

Unclaimed balances on an SVC at expiration are identified as residual funds and, if possible, are returned to the cardholder systematically by Treasury’s designated financial or fiscal agent. If systematic return is not possible, the federal entity and Treasury initiate good faith efforts to locate and return residual funds greater than $10 to the authorized SVC cardholder. Should systematic or good faith return not be possible, residual funds greater than one year old are transferred to the Treasury trust fund receipt account “Unclaimed Moneys of Individuals Whose Whereabouts are Unknown” (see 31 U.S.C. § 1322) to be claimed with supporting documentation by contacting Treasury (see Contacts below). Refer to TFM Volume I, Part 6, Chapter 3000, for additional guidance on residual funds.

Accounting Requirements

Treasury, either directly or through its designated financial or fiscal agents, maintains source data to support each SVC transaction and program expense element. Federal entities comply with Treasury’s applicable accounting requirements with respect to the disbursement and transfer of funds in the SVC program. For example, see, TFM Volume I, Part 2, Chapter 3400 regarding requirements for accounting for and reporting on cash held outside of Treasury.

Payment of SVC Program Costs and Fees

Federal entities and Treasury pay SVC program fees and costs as described in the agreement between the federal entities (see Section 9030) or otherwise agreed upon in writing, in accordance with federal laws, regulations, and policies. Generally, the federal entity funds the costs of cards, card readers, hardware and software installation, certain software development, federal entity-specific SA&A, ATO (or other similar process), program deployment, marketing materials, and marketing peripherals. Treasury generally funds settlement, transaction processing, customer service, standard software development, reporting, program management, and Treasury certification and accreditation costs. The federal entity and Treasury will execute an agreement to effect the payment of these costs and fees.

The federal entity will pay these costs and fees to Treasury promptly when due.

Government Purchase Card

Overview

This chapter prescribes procedures for all departments and federal entities that use the government purchase card. These procedures include program controls and invoice payments.

Authority

31 U.S.C. §§ 3321, 3322, 3327, 3335, 3901, and Public Law 112-194

Policy and Use

While the government purchase card is the preferred method for making purchases at or below the micro-purchase threshold, federal entities should not limit the use of the government-wide commercial purchase card to micro-purchases. Federal entity procedures should encourage the use of purchase cards by contracting officers for greater dollar amounts, to place orders and to pay for purchases against contracts. For more information on the micro-purchase threshold, see the FAR Subpart 13.2.

Federal Entity Purchase Card Policies

Federal entity Procedures

Each federal entity develops its own internal procedures for using the purchase card. Federal entity policies should address the following areas to ensure that clear guidance is provided to the Agency/Organization Program Coordinator (A/OPC)s, Approving Official (AO)s, and cardholders:

delegation of authority,

training requirements,

account limits,

card uses,

receipt and acceptance of supplies and services,

account reconciliation,

review procedures including the use of data mining capabilities to identify delinquency, fraud, misuse, and trends,

span of control of AOs and A/OPCs,

risk management controls,

criteria for establishing accounts, and

criteria for deactivating or canceling accounts with minimal activity.

In addition, all executive branch departments and federal entities must follow the guidance outlined in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular No. A-123, Appendix B: Improving the Management of Government Charge Card Programs. Examples of purchase card specific guidance include:

increasing strategic sourcing initiatives,

performing accounts payable reviews to analyze spending patterns and find ways to increase savings,

limiting the use of convenience checks,

accounting for the environmental quality of products procured with purchase cards, and

managing property acquired with purchase cards.

Federal Entity Refunds

Federal entities receive sales-based refunds and productivity-based refunds from the charge card contractor on a quarterly basis. Sales refunds are based on the dollar or “spend” volume during a specified time period, and productivity refunds are based on the timeliness and/or frequency of payments to the charge card contractor. Refund minimums are included in the current GSA SmartPay master contracts, and federal entity specific refunds are stated in each federal entity specific task order. Federal entities must take steps to maximize sales and productivity refunds in accordance with OMB Circular No. A-123, Appendix B, Chapter 7: Refund Management. Unless specific statutory authority exists that allows refunds to be used for other purposes, refunds must be returned to the appropriation or account from which the purchase was made that generated the refund. Use refunds for any legitimate purchase by the appropriation or account to which they were returned, or as otherwise authorized by statute.

Review and Approval of Billing Statement for Payment

Summary

When using a government purchase card the vendor providing the goods or service to the federal entity is paid by the charge card contractor. The government paying federal entity then reimburses the charge card contractor in accordance with the terms and conditions of the GSA SmartPay master contracts and the Prompt Payment Act.

The cardholder reviews and reconciles the statement of account received at the end of each billing cycle with receipts and supporting documentation, and the approving official verifies reconciled transaction records to ensure that all purchases were proper. Summary level information reflecting all relevant (consolidated) federal entity cardholder transactions is forwarded to the certifying official, within the designated billing office, to ensure that the federal government ultimately pays only for valid charges that are consistent with the terms of the applicable GSA SmartPay master contracts. The cardholder must forward this report to certifying officials within a time frame that allows them to process and pay the consolidated invoice within the Prompt Payment Act deadline. For additional information about charge card statement reconciliation, please read with OMB Circular No. A-123, Appendix B, Chapter 4, Section 4.8.

The designated billing office should make adjustments to the consolidated invoice, based on the statement of accounts received. The designated billing office pays the consolidated invoice in a timely manner even if all statements of accounts are not received (see subsection 4535.10). The GSA SmartPay master contracts contain provisions for disputing any billing discrepancies after payment of the invoices, as long as the charge card contractor is notified within 90 calendar days of the transaction date.

Payments

Payment of the consolidated invoice in a timely manner, even without receiving all statements of accounts, refers to a payment procedure in which payment is made to a contractor before the government’s verification that supplies and/or services have been received. It does not refer to, as provided in the FAR clause 52.232-25, payment to a contractor before the 30th day after receipt of the invoice.

All the provisions of the Prompt Payment Act apply, including interest penalties for late payment. For additional information about charge card statement reconciliation, please read with OMB Circular No. A-123, Appendix B, Chapter 4, Section 4.4.

Training Requirements

Federal entities must require program participants, including A/OPCs, AOs, cardholders, and other accountable/billing officials, to complete purchase card training in order to understand their roles and responsibilities within the charge card program. In accordance with OMB Circular No. A-123, Appendix B, Chapter 3: Training, requirements for executive branch departments and federal entities are as follows:

must train all program participants before appointment,

all program participants must take refresher training, at a minimum, every three years,

all program participants must certify that they have received training, understand the regulations and procedures, and know the consequences of inappropriate actions. Federal entities determine the method of certification, and

must maintain copies of all training certificates pursuant to U.S. National Archives and Records Administration requirements, General Records Schedule 1, Item 10a.

The Office of Charge Card Management (OCCM), within the GSA Federal Acquisition Service, provides online training modules that fulfill OMB Circular No. A-123, Appendix B training requirements to federal entities. In addition, the GSA SmartPay master contracts outline training requirements for charge card contractors, including providing web-based and on-site training options to federal entities.

Electronic

Federal entities may electronically:

receive invoices,

make payments,

access and review account and master file data, and

receive reports.

Each department and federal entity should comply with the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134), and the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (Fiscal Service) Final Rule at 31 CFR 208. The Fiscal Service Final Rule at 31 CFR 208 requires recipients of federal nontax payments to receive payment by electronic funds transfer, effective May 1, 2011, with certain exceptions. Fiscal Service has determined that, wherever possible, federal payments should be made through electronic means. Federal entities, or their agents, should use electronic funds transfer as the standard method of payment for all federal program payments.

Additional Payment Mechanisms

Direct Express® Debit MasterCard®

Direct Express® Debit MasterCard® is a prepaid debit card offered to federal benefit recipients who wish to receive their benefits electronically. The debit card offers the convenience and security of using electronic transactions to spend and access money rather than using cash for purchases. Recipients do not need to have a bank account to sign up for the card. The Direct Express® Debit MasterCard® is available only to individual federal benefit recipients. For more information, see Direct Express® Debit MasterCard®.

GSA SmartPay

GSA SmartPay Program is the world’s largest government charge card and commercial payment solutions program, providing services to more than 560 Federal agencies, organizations, and Native American tribal governments. GSA SmartPay payment solutions enable authorized government employees to make purchases on behalf of the Federal Government in support of their agency/organization’s mission.

For more information, see GSA SmartPay.

Debit Cards

The U.S. Debit Card is a Europay, MasterCard or Visa (EMV) chip/magnetic strip enabled bankcard that can be used by federal entities to make payments to individual recipients. Federal entities can load the card with any amount of value (up to the limits established by the federal entity due to their specific program requirements) before issuing it to a recipient. Once issued to the recipient, the recipient can use the card to access cash at automated teller machines or to make purchases at point-of-sale locations. The card can be used as a disposable payment mechanism that can be discarded after a fixed amount is spent by the recipient. The card also can be used as a reloadable payment mechanism if the federal entity wishes to make multiple payments to the recipient on the card. Federal entities can use the U.S. Debit Card to replace third-party drafts and cash for any payment except benefit payments, and/or where instant issuance is necessary, such as payments for disaster relief. For more information, see U.S. Debit Card.

Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP)

ASAP is the replacement for the letter-of-credit funding technique, which is no longer used by Fiscal Service to fund advances to state and local governments, educational institutions, international institutions, and any other public or private organizations. ASAP is an all-electronic payment and information system through which organizations receiving federal funds can draw from accounts preauthorized by federal entities. ASAP can also be used to make time-sensitive payments to financial agents who are performing financial services for Fiscal Service and other federal entities. ASAP ensures greater efficiency, effectiveness, and equity in the exchange of funds between the federal government and the states, as required by the Cash Management Improvement Act of 1990. Federal entities establish and maintain accounts in ASAP to control the flow of funds to recipient organizations. Federal entities enter spending authorizations into their ASAP accounts in accordance with their program needs and schedules, and the recipient organizations initiate payment requests through ASAP to meet cash needs to administer these respective programs. ASAP can be used to deliver payments by ACH or Fedwire. For more information, see ASAP.

Direct Deposit

Direct deposit is Treasury’s preferred disbursement mechanism for all classes of federal payments. Direct deposit is an electronic payment alternative that uses the ACH network. Federal entities can make payments to individuals or businesses. Payment types include federal employees’ salaries, vendor, travel advances and reimbursements, recurring benefits, and other miscellaneous expenses. Payments to businesses often include an addendum record that provides information about the payment. The recipient uses this information to update the accounts receivable system and/or to reconcile outstanding invoices.

Treasury Checks

Overview

Summary

This chapter prescribes the procedures disbursing officers use to requisition, prepare, and issue four-digit checking account symbol checks drawn on the United States Treasury. Topics include submitting disbursing officers' signature specimens, ordering and controlling blank check stock, and inscribing checks. The procedures apply to all disbursing offices except where otherwise indicated.

For terms and definitions related to this chapter, please view the TFM Glossary.

Authority

See, inter alia, 31 U.S.C. 321, 3321, 3325, 3528.

Disbursing Officers’ Signatures

Submission of Disbursing Officers' Signature Specimens

This section applies specifically to Non-Treasury Disbursing Offices (NTDO) for both new check symbols and existing check symbols.

Accountable Officers, who are empowered to designate disbursing officers, must designate only the minimum number necessary to perform disbursing functions efficiently. Accountable officers, who are NTDO affirming officials and are affirming NTDO disbursing officers for their federal entity, must be in a supervisory capacity to an individual being designated as a NTDO disbursing officer. In addition to submitting information to Fiscal Service, federal entities must maintain records of disbursing officer designations and revocations of authority, including designated disbursing officers' signature specimens.

Manual Signature Specimens

Before issuing checks, a newly designated disbursing officer must forward manual signature specimens, using FS Form 3023 (see Appendix 4), to the federal entity official responsible for maintaining disbursing officer signature specimen files and to Fiscal Service (as indicated by the instructions on the FS Form 3023). Manual signatures on checks must show a reasonably uniform agreement with the specimen signatures provided on the FS Form 3023. If the disbursing officer elects to change his/her signature or if a change in signature occurs as a natural development, the disbursing officer must submit a new FS Form 3023 with new specimen signatures.

The Disbursing Officer should await confirmation from Fiscal Service that FS Form 3023 has been received and processed before beginning the process of issuing checks.

For revocation information, see subsection 5015.30.

Facsimile Signatures and Submission of Specimens

A facsimile signature is a reproduction of a manual signature that can be saved electronically or by engraving or imprinting. The use of facsimile signatures facilitates the affairs of government personnel or any officials to conduct business, because an authorized officer’s facsimile signature has the same weight as his manual signature. The creation of rubber signature stamps and the action of stamping an authorized officer’s signature on U.S. Treasury checks with a rubber stamp is strictly prohibited.

The legal basis for using a facsimile signature - facsimile of an official's actual signature - is specifically authorized under the Uniform Facsimile Signatures of Public Officials Act only for executing public securities and instruments of payment.

In addition to the requirement in subsection 5015.10, a disbursing officer may use a facsimile signature, if necessary. If a disbursing officer would like to use a facsimile signature, he or she must submit an official letter to Fiscal Service informing Fiscal Service of the use of facsimile plates or electronic facsimile signatures in place of manual signatures. The official letter should:

Identify the NTDO disbursing officer whose signature is to be converted to facsimile signature,

Identify the appropriate Agency Location Code (ALC),

Be signed by an appropriate accountable officer from the federal entity who is a NTDO affirming official, who can affirm NTDO disbursing officers for their federal entity, and must be in a supervisory capacity to the individual who is the NTDO disbursing officer whose signature is to be converted to facsimile signature,

Include an assurance statement of the controls in place that confirm essential security safeguards against unauthorized use of the facsimile plates or the electronic facsimile of the provided signature, and

Letters should be sent to the Policy and Oversight Division (see Contacts).

When a facsimile plate or electronic facsimile signature is withdrawn from service, or is to be destroyed, due to the revocation or expiration of a disbursing officer’s designation, (see subsection 5015.30 for how to notify Fiscal Service) and is not to be used again, it must be destroyed and purged from any payment system and any backup systems per procedures established by the federal entity involved. When a facsimile plate has been destroyed, a properly executed certificate identifying the specific plate and date of destruction must be given to the disbursing officer and the federal entity official responsible for maintaining specimen signature files. Federal entities should follow applicable federal and industry information technology regulatory requirements and standards when destroying an electronic file of a facsimile signature. For specific information related to these regulations and requirements, please contact the Policy and Oversight Division (see Contacts).

Revocation of Designation

When an individual for whom a delegation or designation is on file with Fiscal Service departs or otherwise becomes ineligible to act (including through reassignment, retirement, departure, death, etc.), a responsible Accountable Officer should forward to Fiscal Service a FS Form 3023 (see Appendix 4) revoking the delegation or designation of the departing or ineligible Designee. Revocations are effective as of the latter of the effective date requested by the federal entity on the form or the Fiscal Service verification date in Section VI of the FS Form 3023.

When using FS Form 3023 to document a revocation, the submitting federal entity must complete Sections I, II, IV, and V of the form. Revocation forms do not require sample signatures of the individual whose authority is being revoked (Section III), but they must be initialed in Section IV to confirm that any facsimile signature has been destroyed as part of the revocation, and signed in Section V by an appropriate Accountable Official.

Specifications and Characteristics of Treasury Checks

General Physical Characteristics

Blank Treasury checks measure 3-1/4” wide and 7-3/8” long (after bursting and separation from check formats) and are printed on 28-pound paper. The paper used for Treasury checks has a distinct watermark pattern (consisting of both “shaded” and “wire”) manufactured in the paper. This pattern is continuous with “U.S. TREASURY” repeated randomly. The watermark design reads both forwards and backwards. The color of the check is multihued, ranging from light blue to pale peach, featuring the Statue of Liberty boldly engraved on the left side of the check and faintly reproduced in the middle of the check.

Blank Treasury checks currently come in several formats for use in different types of printing machinery (see subsection 5020.20, below). Note that most of these formats will be discontinued and no longer available after October 01, 2020. Only Treasury check formats H & K will remain available after that date.

Blank Check Formats

Disbursing offices may order blank checks in any of the following formats according to their needs:

Format D—A marginally punched, continuous-form single checks. The overall width is 8 1/2 inches, including a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. Horizontal perforation every 3 1/4 inch. Fanfolded every fourth check in unbroken strips, no splices. These checks are packed in cartons of 1,000, 2,000, or 4,000 checks. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format E—A one-up (one sheet with a single check) marginally punched continuous form checks with a check-sized statement on the right. The overall width is 15 7/8 inches, includes a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. An additional vertical perforation will be required 7 15/16 inch from left and right edge (center). Horizontal perforation every 3 1/4 inch. Fanfolded every fourth check/statement in unbroken strips, no splices. These checks are packed in cartons of 2,000 checks/statements or 4,000 checks/statements. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format F—(Grids only) A marginally punched, continuous form of two checks in tandem. The overall width is 15 7/8 inches, including a 9/16 inch marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. An additional vertical perforation will be required 7 15/16 inches from left and right edge (center). Horizontal perforation every 3 1/4 inch. Fanfolded every fourth check/statement in unbroken strips, no splices. These checks are packed in cartons of cartons of 2,000 (4,000 total grids) or 4,000 (8,000 total grids). Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format GS—A one-up marginally punched sheet of check and statement, with option of having check above or below statement. The overall width is 8 1/2 inches, includes a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping, depth 13 inches. Horizontal perforation every 3 1/4 inch. Each sheet will yield two (2) checks and two (2) statements. These checks are packed in cartons of 1,000 or 2,000 checks/statements. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format H—A two-up (one sheet with two checks side by side) marginally punched continuous roll. The overall width is 15 7/8 inches includes a 9/16 inch marginal aligning strip left and right. Each roll contains a leader strip (with alignment marks) minimum of five (5) feet, 80,000 total checks, and a trailing strip of five (5) feet minimum. Maximum roll size 30 inches in diameter with a 5 inch (inside diameter) suitable core. NOTE: All splices, including mill splices and flying splices, are unacceptable. The checks do not have any preprinted symbol or serial numbers. A consecutive inventory control number (ICN) is printed at the top of each check. There are 80,000 checks per roll.

Format I—A one-up marginally punched, continuous-form check with a statement on the left side. The overall width is 15 7/8 inches, includes a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. An additional vertical perforation will be required 7 15/16 inches from left and right edges (center). Horizontal perforation every 3 1/4 inch. Fanfolded every fourth check/statement in unbroken strips, no splices. These checks are packed in cartons of 2,000 or 4,000 checks and statements. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format J—A one-up marginally punched sheet. The overall size is 8 1/2 inches x 13 inches, includes a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. Horizontal perforations every 3 1/4 inch. Each sheet will yield four (4) checks, detached size 7 3/8 inches x 3 1/4 inches. Checks are packed in cartons of 1,000, 2,000 or 4,000 checks. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Format K—A two-up, marginally punched, continuous roll with a statement below the check. The overall width is 15 7/8 inches, including a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right side, with horizontal perforations at the bottom of each check every 6 1/2 inches. Each roll must contain a leader strip (with alignment marks) a minimum of five (5) feet, 40,000 checks and 40,000 statements, and a trailing strip of five (5) feet minimum. NOTE: All splices, including mill splices and flying splices, are unacceptable.

Format M—A One-up marginally punched sheet of check and one (1) statement, with option of having check above or below statement. The overall size is 8 1/2 inches x 13 inches or 11 inches. Includes a 9/16 inch perforated marginal aligning strip left and right, with the option of having the marginal aligning strips removed prior to shipping. A horizontal perforation is at the bottom edge of the check when above statement and at the top edge of the check when below statement. Each sheet will yield one (1) check, 7 3/8 inches x 3 1/4 inches, and one (1) statement. Checks are packed in cartons of 1,000 checks and statements. Effective October 01, 2020, this blank check stock format will no longer be available.

Statement Printing Options

For check formats listed in subsection 5020.20 that have a statement, the statement may be preprinted with the check serial number and other information desired by the disbursing offices, as described by the options in this subsection.

The following statement printing options are available for formats E, GS, I, K, and M:

Option A: Number only,

Option B: Personalized imprint only,

Option C: Statement back only,

Option D: Number and personalized imprint,

Option E: Number and statement back,

Option F: Personalized imprint and statement back, and

Option G: Number, personalized imprint, and statement back.

NOTE: All of the above-listed formats, as well as Format J, will be discontinued and no longer available after October 01, 2020.

The following formats also are available for testing equipment and software:

Test grid checks in Formats D and J, and

Specimen checks in Formats H and K.

Check Symbol Numbers

Checks with serial numbers are preprinted with the four-digit checking account symbol assigned to the disbursing office from which the checks will be issued. Fiscal Service’s Philadelphia Financial Center (PFC) Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section (see Contacts) controls and assigns checking account symbol numbers. The checking account symbol number is in the upper right corner of the check, just before the preprinted serial number. These two numbers, separated by a hyphen, constitute the unique check number. The checking account symbol number and related check digit are preprinted in ink in magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) positions 53 through 49.

Check Serial Numbers

Checks are preprinted with an eight-digit serial number in the upper right corner after a hyphen, immediately following the check symbol number. Serial numbers must not be duplicated within the same checking account symbol. Serial numbers for each account symbol begin with 00001000 and continue through 99999999. The serial number and related check digits are preprinted in MICR positions 31 through 23.

When all serial numbers of a check symbol have been used, Fiscal Service will assign a new checking account symbol for the next supply of checks, if necessary. Accordingly, as serial numbers of checks issued approach 99999999, the disbursing officer should notify the Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section (see Contacts) so a new checking account symbol can be assigned before the next supply of blank checks is ordered. When ordering the new check supply, the disbursing officer should allow additional time for the proof to be changed, in addition to the time normally required to print and deliver the checks (see subsections 5025.30 and 5025.40).

Emergency Check Stock

Under emergency situations only, disbursing offices may use their print systems to produce prenumbered and MICR-encoded check stock for use by other disbursing offices within that federal entity. Disbursing offices with blank check stock must have high-volume check printing equipment using check stock without preprinted check symbol/serial numbers and MICR encoding must have check printing equipment that can print the check symbol/serial numbers and related MICR encoding on the blank check stock.

For example, if office “A” has a fire and its entire supply of check symbol 1234 check stock is destroyed, and office “B” has high-volume printing equipment, then disbursing office “B” can create a limited supply of emergency check symbol 1234 checks for office “A” to last until regular stock is available through normal channels. The emergency check stock created must bear the check symbol 1234 and check serial numbers in the 90-99 million range. The disbursing Officer signing the emergency checks must be authorized to sign checks for that check symbol.

Another example where emergency check stock systems may be used is during unexpected military deployment. Emergency military checks will bear the appropriate check symbol and serial numbers in the 90-99 million range. Manual signatures for emergency check stock should be submitted to the same federal entity official responsible for maintaining disbursing office signatures (see subsection 5015.10). The disbursing office must notify the Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section of the check symbol and serial number ranges involved before the creation and use of emergency checks.

Disbursing offices must not use the emergency check stock system to avoid ordering checks through normal channels. Any emergency check stock must be created under the following conditions:

It must be produced on a print system that has a post/print verification feature to ensure the integrity of the printed and MICR encoded symbol serial numbers, and

Internal control procedures must be in place to prevent issuing duplicate payments bearing the same check symbol/serial numbers.

Transit Number Symbol

Blank Treasury checks bear transit number symbols preprinted in magnetic ink within the 1/2-inch band provided at the bottom of the document. This number, 00000051, plus the check digit “8”, are in MICR positions 42 through 34. The transit number symbol (stroke 10, a measurement as part of the MICR font) shall be pre-printed in MICR positions 33 and 43. The banking system uses the transit number symbol to route and process items for payment. Disbursing offices should verify the accuracy of these transit number symbols and other preprinted and MICR-encoded information before using or issuing checks.

Requisitioning Treasury Checks

Contract Information

The U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) awarded a one-year base contract with 3 option years, a 5-year contract for printing blank checks and exercises overall control over their procurement, while administrative control is exercised by Treasury’s Mission Support Services. After each contract is awarded, the Mission Support Services (see Contacts) issues a notice to all disbursing offices specifying the unit cost of blank checks by type of format and changes to related costs, such as new or revised proofs. Prices are subject to annual changes based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers-Commodities Less Food (CPI), excluding paper and reimbursable postage or transportation costs. Paper prices also are subject to change monthly because of fluctuating costs. This change is based on the BLS Producer Price Indexes Report (BLS code 0913-01) for Offset & Text, Table 6—Producer Price Indexes and Percent Changes for Commodity Groupings and Individual Items.

Current contract information inquiries should be directed to the Mission Support Services (see Contacts).

Designation of Officials Authorized to Sign Check Requisitions

Before any check print orders are submitted, the ordering federal entity must designate one primary and one alternate official as having authority to sign check print orders. Federal entities designate these officials by completing a FS Form 1186: Signature File-U.S. Treasury Check Orders (see Appendix 3), and submitting the completed form to the Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section (see Contacts). The Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section uses the FS Form 1186 to verify the signature on check print orders and to ensure that only authorized officials requisition checks.

Treasury Checks Order Form

Disbursing offices use FS Form 2431: U.S Treasury Checks Order Form (see Appendix 1), to order checks, proofs, and revisions to proofs. (Exception-Fiscal Service's Resource Management Division solicits and consolidates the requirements of Fiscal Service Regional Financial Centers on an annual basis and prepares FS Form 2431s, as appropriate for Treasury Disbursing Offices.)

Current contract prices for check formats and new or revised proofs apply to orders approved by Fiscal Service and received by the contractor up to midnight of the last day of the contract period. All such orders must be delivered within 30 workdays after the contract expires. Disbursing offices must not request that the contractor make deliveries more than 30 workdays after the termination of the contract under which an order is placed. When an order is submitted near the end of a contract period and the disbursing office is placing an order under that contract, it should allow Fiscal Service a minimum of three workdays to process the order and to deliver it to the contractor before the period expires.

Disbursing offices may submit orders requesting deliveries over a period of time. However, final delivery must be made within 30 days after the contract expires.

When specifying delivery dates, disbursing offices should allow two months for printing time (including approval of the order by Treasury and GPO). They should allow an additional two weeks when a change to the check proof is requested.

Check Proofs

On proof orders that call for a change in the check imprint or format, the Mission Support Services will forward to the federal entity's administrative office a photo-print proof of the check provided by the contractor. An authorized individual from the requesting federal entity must review and approve the proof. The federal entity should retain a copy of the proof and must return the original promptly to the Mission Support Services. The approved proof authorizes the contractor to proceed with printing the checks as ordered.

Treasury's Mission Support Services must have in its possession an approved proof from the federal entity before placement of an order for checks.

Quantities of Checks

Disbursing offices should order a supply of checks to last a year, unless there is a good reason to request a supply for a longer or shorter period. They should explain the methodology used to determine the quantity of checks needed to last a year, as well as any such reason why the supply is to last for a shorter or longer period of time on FS Form 2431 under “Remarks.” The minimum amount of any format, except roll stock, is 100 checks. Smaller quantities can be requested in multiples of 100. Larger quantities must be in multiples of 1,000.

Check Numbers

The initial order for serially numbered checks must specify that the numbers begin with 00001000. All serial number ranges end in xxxx999 for quantities in multiplies of 1000, and in xxxx99 for quantities of 100. Subsequent orders must specify serial numbers that follow exactly in sequence as those on preceding orders

Shipping

The contractor ships check orders to the delivery destination designated on FS Form 2431 via express package carrier or registered mail if express packages cannot be accepted. However, roll stock is palletized and ships via armored carrier. The contractor sends an advice of shipment notice to the consignee when the order is shipped.

The contractor prepays all shipping charges. These charges are included in the contractor's invoice.

Cancellation of Orders

If production operations have begun, Treasury's Mission Support Services advises the disbursing office of the cost charged. Then, the FS Form 2431 requesting the order is canceled, properly notating the amount charged, and is used as the basis for the contractor's invoice to GPO.

When a print order has been canceled, the disbursing office or its administrative office must notify the Analysis Reconciliation & Reporting Section (see Contacts).

Safekeeping and Control of Blank Check Stock

Safekeeping

Disbursing officers are responsible for strictly protecting blank checks against loss or theft. Procedures should include such security measures as the following:

The level of security required for blank check stock (BCS) storage and construction of a secure storage room or installation of a GSA-approved security container is addressed in the context of the following:

the level of risk to which BCS is exposed,

other security provided by the facility within which BCS is located, and

meeting minimum requirements set forth for the protection of BCS.

Disbursing offices may store BCS in either an appropriately protected GSA-approved security container or in a secure room (see Appendix 2). BCS storage should provide a high standard of security against theft and should prevent damage to checks from moisture, light, and heat.

The container must be protected by volumetric or capacitance intrusion detection devices for which alarms result in appropriate, timely responses. Volumetric devices detect the presence of a body or moving object within a specific area via the use of infrared, microwave, or sonar measurement devices. Capacitance devices detect intruders via the use of measurement devices that detect electrical properties of the human body. Typically, both volumetric and capacitance detection devices are used together to reduce the likelihood of false alarms. Used in concert, these two types of devices can detect relatively harmless intruders, such as mice, while simultaneously indicating that the electrical measurements of the intruders do not indicate human bodies; therefore, no alarm is initiated. Each type of detection device has its strengths and weaknesses, which must be considered in designing a system that makes effective use of both types of technology.

Note:

All intrusion detection devices must be connected to a manned, 24-hour monitoring station and must use supervised or secure lines. The monitoring station must be supported by an appropriate, timely response capability.

If volumetric devices are used, dual technology volumetric intrusion devices are preferred because they minimize the potential for false alarms.

Disbursing offices must restrict access to BCS storage to officially authorized persons only. They must log entry and exit to BCS storage and must maintain the logs for a minimum of one year. Automated access control into and out of the secure area is recommended in lieu of manually maintained logs but is not mandatory.

Disbursing offices should prohibit smoking, eating, or other activities that could damage BCS in the storage area.

Access controls such as lock combinations or personal identification numbers must immediately be changed when the possibility of compromise exists. Circumstances that warrant combination changes include the following:

the transfer, retirement, termination, or resignation of a person having the combination or access code,

installation of new secure storage areas,

repairs being made to the locking mechanism,

upon notification that any records containing combinations or access control codes or devices have been lost, stolen, or compromised, and

one year has elapsed since the combination or access control codes were changed.

Access control cards and similar devices must be immediately deactivated any time the individual to whom issued no longer requires access or when the individual retires, resigns, or is terminated.

Intrusion detection devices must be installed in the secure room and must be coupled with an appropriate and timely response capability (for instance, Federal Protective Service, contract security, police, or other designated personnel). Automated assessment capability is acceptable; however, response capability must exist.

Officially designated persons should inspect and lock secure storage containers or areas for BCS storage. Persons so designated should inspect the secure container or storage area before locking and should certify the result of the inspection and the security of storage in a written log.

The disbursing officer or an authorized representative should conduct unannounced inventories of blank checks at irregular intervals. Unannounced inventories should be conducted at least every 60 days. Irregularities should be investigated immediately, and any loss or theft should be reported as prescribed in subsection 5030.20.

Loss or Theft

Immediately upon discovery of lost, missing, or stolen blank checks, the disbursing office must notify, via telephone, the Fiscal Service's Security Division via the Fiscal Service IT Service Desk. The disbursing office should follow up with a letter, fax, or email. Fiscal Service, as appropriate, will refer incidents to the Treasury Inspector General. The follow-up notification must include the following:

The checking account symbol and serial numbers of the checks involved, and

A statement giving complete information concerning the circumstances of the lost, missing, or stolen checks. If the loss involves a range of consecutive serially numbered checks, only the beginning and ending serial numbers of the range are needed.

Disbursing officers should report checks that are discovered to be missing, lost, or stolen before issuance (including any items missing from blank check shipments received from the contractor), as voids, per TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000, subsection 6040.10. Contact the Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section for guidance (see Contacts).

Quality Control Inspections and Reporting Irregularities

Immediately before using blank checks, the disbursing office must examine a sample group to ensure the checks are satisfactory and bear correct preprinted information. The checks must have a proper background tint and printing that is clear, complete, and of uniform density with no smears or blotches. The disbursing office must verify preprinted checking account symbols and serial numbers, MICR encoding, and other information to ensure there are no discrepancies.

If discrepancies between preprinted check symbols and serial numbers, or other defects are discovered, the disbursing office must notify Treasury's Mission Support Services, which then notifies the contractor for replacement or credit (providing the number of items involved is large enough to warrant such action). The disbursing office must void and process the irregular checks per TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000, Section 6040. It must handle apparent gaps or “skips” within the serial number ranges as possible losses of the items bearing the missing serial numbers, per subsection 5030.20.

Disposition of Unused BCS

When a new disbursing officer acquires the four-digit check symbol checking accounts of his or her predecessor, he or she also acquires the unused BCS. Checks preprinted with check symbol numbers must not be altered nor issued over a different account symbol.

Disbursing offices have been given authority to destroy unused checks locally and to report the destroyed checks as void checks, see TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000, Section 6040. If disbursing offices destroy unused checks, it must be done by shredding or incineration on site or at an approved federal shredding facility outside of the disbursing office, after which the shredding fragments may be disposed of as waste. Shredded fragments must not be larger than 1/8th inch in width and 3½ inches in length. Fiscal Service requires the use of a cross-cut shredder. The incineration method of destruction may only be used, subject to environmental regulations, when a disbursing office does not have shredding equipment. The Policy and Oversight Division (see Contacts) must approve the use of alternative facilities.

The disbursing office must complete and submit to the PFC Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section a Certificate of Destruction, signed by the disbursing officer and three witnesses to the actual destruction, each time checks are destroyed. The Certificate of Destruction must show the method and date of destruction, the quantity of checks destroyed, the applicable check symbol number, and the serial numbers of the checks destroyed (beginning and ending numbers for each range of consecutively numbered checks). The disbursing officer should retain a copy of the Certificate of Destruction as part of the blank check inventory control records.

Drawing and Inscribing Treasury Checks

Protection of Checks in Process of Preparation

Disbursing officers must maintain efficient controls for checks in the process of preparation. These controls must be designed to protect against loss or theft and must provide for prompt disclosure of check loss or theft. See subsection 5030.20 for procedures to follow in the event of loss or theft.

Postprint Verification of Checks Without Preprinted Check Symbol and Serial Numbers

Check printing systems using checks without preprinted check symbol and serial numbers must have a postprint verification unit that reads and verifies certain critical data elements after the optical character reader-B (OCR-B) and MICR data have been printed. The data elements read are the OCR-B check symbol, serial number, the dollar amount, and the entire MICR line. The system must internally calculate the check digits for the check symbol and serial number on the MICR line and must verify correctness. It must compare the MICR data with the OCR-B data and both the OCR-B and MICR data with the data from the input tape. If any character fails to verify correctly, the check or checks must be rejected, marked “void-not negotiable,” and reprinted correctly at a later time.

Mechanical Equipment for Drawing Checks

Disbursing offices should select machinery per its ability to draw checks according to procedures and standards in this chapter. Disbursing offices should not enter requisitions for checks with radical changes in standard forms just to accommodate the peculiarities of a certain machine. In addition, the disbursing office should consider the manufacturer's ability to service the machinery when selecting any equipment.

Disbursing offices should maintain the equipment to produce the best results in writing checks. Adjustments that provide for placement and alignment of the data added to the check must always be in good order. The inking mechanism should receive careful attention. Excessively inked ribbons and worn ribbons should not be used.

Requirements Applicable to Check Signing Machines and Payment Systems

Machines and payment systems that print facsimile signatures on checks shall comply with the applicable federal and industry information technology regulatory requirements and standards to prevent unauthorized use of the equipment and the disbursing officer's facsimile signature. For specific information related to these regulations and requirements, please contact the Policy and Oversight Division (see Contacts).

Quality Standards of Printing

The printed or written characters of the data added in drawing checks, including the facsimile signature, should have sharp lines, a continuous and homogeneous deposit of ink, and no filling. Also, the characters printed using ribbon technology must not have a pronounced ribbon pattern. Data added in drawing checks must show no appreciable impairment of legibility after being passed through endorsers. Contrast between added printed or written data and the surface tint of the check should ensure high legibility for accurate reading in rapid handling and should serve as a deterrent to alteration.

General Instructions for Inscribing and Positioning of Data Added to Checks

The correct position of the date, amount, payee's name, and signature of the disbursing officer is determined by the physical characteristics and layout of the blank check. Disbursing officers must avoid deviations from the normal positioning of this information on checks. If not reprinted on the checks by the contractor, the disbursing office must ensure that the place of issue and the object for which drawn are shown on checks before issuance. To standardize printing and facilitate accuracy verification, words on checks should be inscribed in all uppercase (that is, capital) letters and punctuation should be omitted, except commas used in addresses and to set off names of more than two payees. Spaces that would invite or facilitate alteration and addition must not be left unfilled. Data not essential for issuance and payment should be reduced to a minimum and may appear only to the left of the center of the check, just above the line running completely across the face of the check above the MICR line.

Inscription of Payee Name and Other Identification Data

Payee's Name

Checks must be clearly inscribed with the complete payee name to facilitate accurate payee identification at the time of check negotiation. Disbursing offices, and others, that prepare vouchers and schedules on which disbursing offices must rely when preparing checks must write the names in a manner that will ensure proper identification procedures. To ensure correct endorsement and for other customary reasons, the surname of the payee should appear last. The correct order is first name, middle name or initial, and last name. Where the payee has an often-used surname, the use of initials only (such as “J D MILLER” or “R T JONES”) in lieu of full given names can cause confusion as to the identity of the rightful payee. When a payee's legal given name consists of initials only, the words “Initials Only” should be shown after the initials.

In view of the important services provided by banks and merchants that cash Treasury checks, the federal government has a special obligation to see that payees' names, as they appear on checks, contribute to prompt and specific identification of the payees when the checks are presented for cashing or are received by banking institutions for deposit to the payees' accounts. Requirements for inscribing checks drawn to federal entities of the federal government are prescribed in TFM Volume I, Part 5, Chapter 2000, Section 2020.

Address

When checks are to be mailed, the full and complete address of the payee must be entered on the checks or envelopes, including as necessary: rural route numbers, box numbers, house numbers, zip codes, and any other information essential to correct delivery.

Other Identification Data

Checks drawn to commercial concerns, institutions, grantees, or vendors often require account or invoice numbers and other kinds of identification data, as well as the payee name, in order to be properly applied to the account for which moneys are due. Such identification data must be inscribed on the checks on the basis of voucher-schedules of payments prepared by the federal entities per TFM Volume I, Part 4A, Chapter 2000. Disbursing offices must not place identification data in any position on a check where it is visible through the envelope window. In the absence of such data on the voucher-schedules, enclosures (that is, invoices, tear-off coupons, or other forms) containing the identification data may be provided for mailing with the checks.

Check Dating, Inscription, Printing, and Maximums

Position of Check Issue Date

Disbursing offices must write the date of issue in the upper right portion of the check, either above or below the check number.

The date must be written in month (spelled out or abbreviated), day, year sequence.

Restriction on Postdating of Checks (5035.45)

Disbursing offices must not inscribe checks with a date of issue that is later than the date the checks are delivered to the payees. If the checks bear issue dates predetermined in accordance with a time schedule, they must not be delivered to the payees in advance of the scheduled payment date. However, mailed checks should be released to the U.S. Postal Service reasonably in advance of the issue date to allow for transit time.

Inscription of Check Amount

The check amount must be printed per the quality standards prescribed in subsection 5035.25. The amount must be printed in clearly distinguishable type characters. For example, the “l” and “7” must be clearly distinct. In addition, the type should be of a conservative and standard design and of a size to discourage alteration and make any attempts at altering figures clearly evident (OCR-B is recommended). Particular attention should be given to characters that might be susceptible to conversion to a higher figure; for example, altering a “1” to a “7” or a “3” to an “8”. The printing should be of large enough size to withstand folding, spindling, and small tears. The check amount data should not be visible through the envelope window in the address field, since the numbers might confuse U.S. Postal Service address-scanning equipment.

Printing of Dollar Sign

If the amount is printed once, only in numerical figures, then the dollar sign must be included as part of the amount printing. If the amount is printed twice on the checks (once in numerical figures and the second in alphabetical letters) the dollar sign does not have to be used for the numerical figures, provided these figures are printed within the convenience amount box and all available print sections within the block contain asterisks.

Printing and Positioning of Marginal Amount (5035.50b)

On checks without preprinted amount boxes, the amount of the check should appear in the right-quarter section of the check in the area above the signature of the disbursing officer and below the check number. It should be in horizontal alignment with the name or address of the payee. The amount figures should fill their allotted area completely. No space should be left unfilled that might be susceptible to use for fraudulent insertion.

Inscription of Medial Amount in Body of Checks (5035.50c)

Writing the amount in the body of a check in words (usually feasible when a machine capable of writing words is used) provides the disbursing office and Treasury greater safety against alteration of amount. Therefore, Treasury encourages this practice. However, if the disbursing office determines that a substantial cost savings would result from not writing the medial amount, Treasury permits this.

If the disbursing office determines that substantial cost savings would result from writing the medial amount in figures, either of the following forms may be used: “$50and75cents” or “$50and75/100”. No spacing appears within an amount written in either form. Contact the Policy and Oversight Division for guidance (see Contacts).

Maximum Amount for Which Checks Can be Issued

Disbursing offices must not issue a check in an amount exceeding $99,999,999.99. When it is necessary to make payment in excess of this amount by check, the disbursing office must issue two or more checks. Disbursing officers should also consider contacting Fiscal Service to discuss alternative payment options in place of large dollar check payments.

Signatures

Signatures of Disbursing Officers

Each check issued must bear one of the following:

the manual signature of the disbursing officer, or

an approved facsimile signature of the disbursing officer.

Manual Signatures of Disbursing Officers

Manual signatures must substantially conform with the specimen signatures previously submitted on FS Form 3023 to the federal entity official responsible for maintaining specimen signature files (see subsection 5015.10). Disbursing officers should avoid awkward or unusual conditions that would cause an abnormal signature on the checks. A permanent black ink should be used for manual signatures. The ink should not be subject to fading and should not be readily soluble in water.

Facsimile Signatures

When facsimile signatures are used, the disbursing officer's approved facsimile signature must be printed on checks in accordance with subsection 5035.20a. The facsimile should appear within a frame or border that conforms to the design adopted by the disbursing officer's department or administrative office.

Space Provided for Printing in Magnetic Ink

The standard Treasury check format provides space at the bottom of the check for information encoded in magnetic ink used by banks in proof and payment operations. This MICR area extends from the bottom edge of the check to 9/16 inches from the bottom edge of the check and across the entire 7-3/8 inch length of the check. Disbursing offices must be careful not to enter printed data within the 1/2-inch MICR band at the bottom of the check.

Imperfect Checks

Controls to Prevent Release of Imperfect Checks

Disbursing offices must establish controls to prevent the release of imperfect checks. They should treat checks prepared on defective check stock or bearing erasures, alterations, overprinting, strike-overs, and imperfect letters or figures as spoiled and should void them. Disbursing offices must deface and dispose of imperfect checks as prescribed in TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000, Section 6040, to prevent the possibility of the imperfect checks being negotiated.

Imperfect Checks Returned by Holders

If a holder returns an imperfect check, the disbursing office must carefully examine the check to determine:

If the imperfection may have occurred during the issuance process, or was the result of accidental mutilation after issuance, or

If the imperfection and circumstances surrounding the return of the check constitute likely evidence of an attempt to alter or fraudulently negotiate the check.

Depending on the circumstances, the disbursing office must take the appropriate action as described in subsection 5035.70a or 5035.70b.

No Apparent Evidence of Attempted Fraud

If the inspection reveals no basis that the imperfection resulted from an attempt to fraudulently alter the check, the disbursing office should issue the holder an alternate serially numbered check. See TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000, Sections 6030, 6040, and 6045, for procedures concerning spoiled and voided checks.

Evidence of Possible Fraud

If a check returned by a holder bears evidence of attempted fraud, the disbursing office must notify the Fiscal Service's Security Division via the Fiscal Service IT Service Desk (304-480-7777) Fiscal Service, as appropriate, will refer these incidents to the Treasury Inspector General. The disbursing office must also submit an on-line unavailable check cancellation transaction to the Treasury Check Information System (TCIS).

Checking Accounts with The U.S. Treasury

Introduction

This chapter prescribes procedures that government departments, agencies, disbursing officers, and others must follow when using and operating 4-digit symbol checking accounts with the Department of the Treasury (Treasury).

Overview

Areas covered include instructions on checking account symbol maintenance (how to request, change, close, or reopen a 4-digit Disbursing Office (DO) symbol), reporting check-issue transactions to the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (Fiscal Service), processing voided checks, and adjusting check-issue discrepancies and related matters.

Checking Account Symbol Maintenance

To request, change, close, or reopen a 4-digit DO symbol, the appropriate agency official from the agency's administrative office should sign and send a letter to the Philadelphia Financial Center (PFC) of Fiscal Service. The requesting party must send the original, signed letter on official agency letterhead. See Contacts.

Opening a 4-Digit Disbursing Office Symbol

Agencies that are authorized to do their own disbursing (31 U.S.C. 3321) must submit written justification to PFC citing their authority to do so. To request a new 4-digit DO symbol, the official must certify that no other DO can reasonably do its disbursing. In addition, the request must indicate if the agency will issue Treasury check stock or will only be established to report information concerning disbursements made by other DOs.

PFC will notify the agency (in writing) of the 4-digit DO symbol that was assigned based on the agency's request.

Changing a 4-Digit Disbursing Office Symbol

It is the agency's responsibility to notify PFC when information for a particular DO symbol changes. This includes changes in an address, a Disbursing Officer, a contact person, or a telephone number. The date the DO symbol was opened can be changed if the DO symbol was established with a future opened date and that date has not yet occurred. If the DO symbol has closed, agencies can process changes to the successor Agency Location Code (ALC).

PFC will notify the agency (in writing) of changes made to its ALC information so the agency can be assured that all of the requested changes were made.

Closing a 4-Digit Disbursing Office Symbol

Before requesting that a DO symbol be closed, the DO must do the following:

Destroy all unused check stock. The DO must not submit unused check stock to Fiscal Service (see section 6040.20), and

Submit a transmittal of zero issue amounts for each check destroyed to the Treasury Check Information System (TCIS).

The letter requesting the closure of a 4-digit DO symbol should specify a successor 4-digit ALC (which is determined by the agency) to do the following:

Receive subsequent limited payability cancellation credits, and

Process adjustments that may be found after the DO closes.

Closing a 4-digit DO symbol requires two steps by Fiscal Service:

First, after receiving the close request letter, PFC verifies that the DO has reported all check-issue information to the TCIS and closes all authorized check ranges. PFC notifies the agency (in writing) that the authorized check ranges have been closed. PFC also informs the agency that it has forwarded the agency's request to close the symbol to the Cash Accounting Branch (CAB).

Second, the CAB closes the DO symbol in the Central Accounting and Reporting System (CARS) ALC Master File. Before CAB closes a 4-digit DO symbol, the DO must have a zero balance in the following three audits: deposit in transit, undisbursed, and check-issue reporting. CAB sends the agency written notification of closure. See Contacts. Agencies must report SF 1218/1221 or SF 1219/1220 Statement of Transactions/Statement of Accountability to the CARS until CAB closes the symbol in the ALC Master File.

Fiscal Service financial centers that print and disburse checks for Treasury Disbursing Offices (TDOs) must also submit requests to close 4-digit check symbols when the range of check serial numbers has been exhausted and all check-issue information has been reported to the TCIS.

Reopening a 4-Digit Disbursing Office Symbol

Treasury will reopen a DO symbol if it is under the same agency name and at the same geographical location as when it was previously open. In addition, the reopened office must continue to provide the exact services as the original. If the original office both reported and disbursed Treasury checks, PFC will not reopen the symbol if the agency intends to be only a reporting office. If the proposed reopened DO will not provide the same services as originally provided, the agency should request that PFC establish a new 4-digit DO symbol (see paragraph 6015.10).

The DO must send the request to reopen a 4-digit DO symbol to PFC in writing (see contacts). PFC will notify the agency (in writing) that the 4-digit DO symbol has been reopened.

Federal Financial Management Standards

Functions and Activities

Payment Disbursement (FFM.030.110)

Generate disbursement schedules from payment transactions

Perform quality assurance validations

Certify disbursement schedules

Warehouse disbursement schedules for transmission to Treasury

Federal Financial Management System Requirements

Making payments (2.2.2)

Capture federal government unique invoice prompt payment information (for example, invoice receipt date, discount, applicable interest rate determined per government formula, and accelerated payment) to support payment of invoices as specified in the CFR

Determine disbursement terms and amounts in accordance with the terms of the contract or agreement, and based on determination of invoice term, payment date, interest or penalty applicable, and amount as specified in the CFR.

Provide certified payment transaction information for the disbursing office to make disbursements as specified in the TFM.

Agencies for which Treasury does not disburse (for example, Senate): Provide payment disbursement forms that include payment transactions consistent with Government Accountability Office (GAO) policy and procedures and as specified in the TFM.

Use Cases

Procure to Pay

Treasury Financial Manual (TFM)

TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 4500; Government Purchase Cards

TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 5000; Requisitioning, Preparing, and Issuing Treasury Checks

TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 6000; Checking Accounts with the U.S. Treasury

TFM Volume I, Part 4, Chapter 9000; Stored Value Cards (SVCs)

TFM Volume I, Part 4a, Chapter 3000; Requirements for Scheduling Payments Disbursed by the Bureau of the Fiscal Service

Contact Information

Contact Details

For direct inquiries concerning Automated Clearing House (ACH) and Direct Express/ Debit MasterCard:

Chief Disbursing Officer
Payment Management
Bureau of the Fiscal Service

3201 Pennsy Drive, Building E
Landover, MD 20785

855-868-0151

For direct inquiries concerning Stored Value Cards:

Attn: Nadir Isfahani
Bureau of the Fiscal Service
Department of the Treasury

3201 Pennsy Drive, Building E
Landover, MD 20785

202-874-5215

For additional information on Stored Value Cards (SVC), visit the following websites:

Bureau of the Fiscal Service

Stored Value Card

EZpay

EagleCash

NavyMarineCash

For additional guidance for Stored Value Card (SVC) programs used by the U.S. military:

See Department of Defense’s Financial Management Regulation (DoD FMR).

For direct inquiries regarding Government Purchase Cards:

Department of the Treasury
Bureau of the Fiscal Service
Payment Management
Policy and Oversight Division

3201 Pennsy Drive, Building E
Landover, MD 20785

202-874-6781

For direct inquiries concerning the contract through which the government-wide charge card services are offered to:

Office of Charge Card Management
Federal Acquisition Service
General Services Administration

703-605-2808

For inquiries concerning contract prices and other contract related matters; shipping costs; notices to cancel orders for blank checks; and notices of problems, defects, or missing items in shipments received from the contractor, contact:

Mission Support Services -
Communications and Document Services Branch
Department of the Treasury

1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20220

202-622-2150

For Inquiries concerning assignment of check symbols; submission of FS Form 3023s; submission of FS Form 1186s; prenotification of check symbol and serial numbers involved in emergency check stock cases; submission of FS Form 2431; notification of canceled print orders; and missing, lost, or stolen (before issuance) checks, including items missing from blank check shipments received from the contractor that were not replaced, to:

Attention: Analysis, Reconciliation & Reporting Section
Philadelphia Financial Center
Bureau of the Fiscal Service
Department of the Treasury

PO Box 603
Bensalem, PA 19020

215-516-8106

Direct requests for FS Form 2431 to the federal entity's printing officer. The printing officer should forward a Portable Document Format (pdf) file of the request to:

Mail Stop: CSAPS, Team 2, Room C-836
U.S. Government Printing Office

732 North Capitol Street, NW
Washington, DC 20401

202-512-1239

Direct matters regarding blank check stock security, loss, or theft to:

Physical Security Branch
Bureau of the Fiscal Service
Department of the Treasury

6505 Belcrest Road, Suite 613
Hyattsville, MD 20782

General information and to report incidents:

304-480-7777

Direct inquiries concerning all other matters, including requests for approval of the placement of printing on checks and approval of additional printing, to:

Department of the Treasury
Bureau of the Fiscal Service
Policy and Oversight Division

3201 Pennsy Drive, Building E
Landover, MD 20785

202-874-6781

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Issuing Payments

This page was last updated on September 29, 2021.